Matthew Delmont

Matthew Delmont

Renowned Civil Rights, Diversity & Inclusion Expert, Best-Selling Author of Black Quotidian and Half American

Speaker Categories: | Black History Month | Diversity, Inclusion | Diversity, Inclusion

Travels From: NH, United States.

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Matthew Delmont Bio
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Renowned Civil Rights, Diversity & Inclusion Expert, Best-Selling Author of Black Quotidian and Half American

A Guggenheim Fellow and Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor of History at Dartmouth College, Dr. Matthew Delmont is an expert on American history, Black American history, and the civil rights movement. In his passionate and engaging lectures, Dr. Delmont speaks on social justice, diversity and inclusivity, and the history of racism in America.

Books

Dr. Matthew Delmont is the author of Black Quotidian: Everyday History in African American Newspapers and the upcoming Half American: The Epic Story of African Americans Fighting World War II at Home and Abroad (2022). Dr. Delmont was inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement to showcase the historical value of the stories of both famous and ordinary Black Americans. The result, Black Quotidian, is an archive of digitized Black American newspapers that examines the everyday lives of Black Americans in the twentieth century. Black Quotidian won the American Studies Association’s Garfinkel Prize for its exceptional work at the intersection of American Studies and Digital Humanities. In his upcoming book, Half American, Dr. Delmont analyzes the history of Black Americans who fought bravely abroad in a segregated military during World War II, and returned home to battle white supremacy in America.

Racial Diversity Expert

Through his research, Dr. Delmont examines the history of racial platitudes– how Americans talk about race without doing anything about racism–that traces back to the World War II era, the importance of Black newspapers, which served as vital forerunners of today’s social media activism, and racist school policies and how they affect school segregation to this date. An engaging and eloquent historian, he has spoken with various Fortune 500 companies, universities, and civic groups on the history of racism in America, the current Black Lives Matter movement, and how to create a more equitable future.

Education

Dr. Delmont now is the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor of History at Dartmouth College. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Times, The Atlantic, Washington Post, and NPR, among several other academic journals. Dr. Delmont graduated from Harvard University, and earned his Master’s and Ph.D. from Brown University. At Dartmouth College, he serves as an advisor to the President for faculty diversity. Prior to Dartmouth College, Dr. Delmont taught at Scripps College, where he was awarded 2011 Professor of the Year, and was the Director of the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies at Arizona State University. He was awarded with a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2017 and a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Public Scholar Award in 2020.

From Civil Rights to #BlackLivesMatter

More than 25 million Americans have participated in Black Lives Matter protests in every state in the country. Millions more people have joined protests globally. By most accounts, Black Lives Matter is the largest social movement in U.S. history. In this talk, award-winning historian Matthew Delmont explores the founding of Black Lives Matter and explains how today's movement continues the freedom struggles that civil rights activists waged in the 1950s and 1960s.

The Past and Future of Black History Month

Started nearly one-hundred years ago, Black History Month has changed how generations of Americans learn about the nation's past and has elevated figures such as Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and Harriet Tubman into the pantheon of American icons. Drawing on his award-winning digital book Black Quotidian, historian Matthew Delmont argues that the time is ripe for a fresh approach to Black History Month. He highlights hidden figures from Black history and explains why this history should be studied and celebrated not only in February but all year round.

Half American: The Epic Story of Black Americans Fighting World War II at Home and Abroad

For Black Americans World War II was about not only America’s standing in the world but also about how much actual freedom would exist in the United States. Black troops were at Normandy, Iwo Jima, and the Battle of the Bulge. They fought bravely in combat and they formed the backbone of the United States military’s supply effort, enabling the Allies to fight and win a global war. They did all of this while fighting in a segregated military. Black veterans returned from the war and kept fighting white supremacy at home, fueling the civil rights movement. Drawing on his upcoming book, historian Matthew Delmont explains how World War II raised questions regarding race and democracy that remain unanswered more than seventy years later. This is an inspiring history of bravery and patriotism in the face of unfathomable racism.

Reckoning with School Segregation

More than 65 years after the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that racially separate schools are “inherently unequal,” school segregation is getting worse. The path toward a more racially just society requires Americans to reckon honestly with the policies and choices that have produced and maintained a profoundly unequal educational system. Drawing on his book Why Busing Failed, historian Matthew Delmont explains why school segregation has persisted and how parents, business leaders, and communities can chart a more equitable future.

Origins and Importance of Juneteenth

Juneteenth is a celebration of freedom from slavery. President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, but word of that didn't reach Texas until 1865. The word Juneteenth comes from June 19, 1865—the moment that the last group of African Americans who were enslaved learned about their freedom. In the wake of recent protests for racial justice, there's been an increased focus on Juneteenth—the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States. Matthew Delmont believes Juneteenth speaks to the larger moment that we're in right now, where as a nation people are trying to grapple with the unresolved legacies of slavery and the unresolved challenges of the Civil Rights era, and trying to educate themselves on these aspects of African American history.

  • Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation
    Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation Purchase Book
  • Making Roots: A Nation Captivated
    Making Roots: A Nation Captivated Purchase Book

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Recent Books

  • Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation
    Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation Purchase Book
  • Making Roots: A Nation Captivated
    Making Roots: A Nation Captivated Purchase Book
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